Harold Michael Harvey, JD

Atlanta 229
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Joined February 2009

Harold Michael Harvey, JD, is the author of the critically acclaimed novel “Paper Puzzle.” He is an award winning journalist, a past president of the Gate City Bar Association, and a 2012 Fall Organizing Fellow with Organizing for America, President Obama’s grassroots get out the vote campaign. His second novel, “White Whisky,” is schedule to be released summer 2014, as will a non-fiction book, “Flogging and blogging Barack Obama.” He lives in Atlanta, Georgia and writes in the Great Smoky Mountains.

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Calls to impeach Federal Judge could block GOP efforts to impeach Obama

Terri Sewell (D) Alabama wasted no time in getting the ball rolling to impeach Federal Magistrate Mark Fuller, a judge in the Middle District of Alabama, who is charged in Atlanta, Georgia of beating his wife in a hotel room last summer. Fuller was allowed to enter a pretrial diversion program by Georgia court officials because he does not have an official record of spousal abuse. Although there are unconfirmed allegations that Fuller’s first marriage ended amid complaints of spousal abuse. During the just completed midterm campaign season, many of Alabama’s top federal and state elected officials called for Fuller to resign, citing his inability to dispense justice given his criminal woes. Thus far, Fuller has steadfastly refused to voluntarily resign. Last month Sewell gave Fuller until November 12, to resign or she would start impeachment proceedings against him. You can read her prom...

Georgia Democrats go down to a crushing midterm defeat

What went wrong for Georgia Democrats in the midterm election? Republicans again swept every contested statewide race. The election returns point out the fact that black voters represent the bulk of the Democratic base in Georgia, but more than 90 percent of white voters cast their ballots for the Republican ticket. In Georgia, blacks make up about 30 percent of the voting electorate. Although this is a sizable block vote, Democrats will have to attract white voters if they hope to ever compete for statewide offices in the future. DuBose Porter became the chairman of the Georgia Democratic Party when Michael Berlon resigned in disgrace, as the midterm election season was kicking into gear. He only has himself to blame for his party’s dismal performance. First, Porter bought into the "Michelle Nunn inevitable nominee theory." He took affirmative steps to block a spirited primary campaign ...

Can the Federal Election Commission rein in anonymous donors?

Can the Federal Election Commission rein in financial contributions from third-party anonymous donors? This is the question on the mind of Ann M. Ravel, the incoming chairwoman of the election commission. Ravel, currently the commission's vice chair, was in Atlanta in October to host a public hearing seeking testimony on where the commission should focus its attention on campaign finance as the nation approaches the 2016 presidential election campaign. Held at the Emory University Law School, the event drew several hundred people, many of whom gave Ravel an earful on the evil of money in not only federal elections, but in state elections as well. Congress established the Federal Election Commission in 1975 and charged it with administering federal campaign financial contributions and the financing of presidential campaigns. The commission requires all candidates for federal offices to re...

Racial sparks fly in Georgia Midterm Election   

In 1981, Andrew Young was engaged in a tight race with Sidney Marcus, a white state legislator, to succeed Maynard Jackson as mayor of Atlanta. For two years leading up to this election, the business community had searched high and low to find a white candidate to run for mayor. They did not want another black mayor after sharing the spoils of politics for two terms with the black friends of Jackson, the city’s first black mayor. A number of prominent blacks had been recruited by the business community to support Marcus, the white candidate. As the October 28, 1981 election date drew near, the race was a toss-up. So Jackson lit a fuse under the black electorate while speaking at a Hungry Club Luncheon at the Butler Street YMCA. He told those gathered that black leaders supporting Marcus were “Shuffling and grinning Negroes” and they were “Acting like slaves, who refused to leave the plan...

Zell Miller is back, zigging and zagging through Georgia’s Mid-Term Election

Zell Miller began his very colorful political career as a mentee of Lester Maddox, Georgia’s last segregationist governor. He parlayed that apprenticeship into a distinguished career as a State Senator and a popular two-term governor. He is the next to last Democrat to serve as governor of Georgia. Along the way, Miller gained the nickname Zig Zag Zell because of his penchant for changing his position on an issue in mid-stream. It could be said that Miller is the consummate southern politician. During his tenure as governor, Miller pushed through para-mutual betting legislation that created a state lottery designed to fund pre-K education and to provide college scholarships for high school graduates. When he left the governor’s office he ran for a seat in the United States Senate and won. He left Georgia a Democrat and came back home an angry turncoat without any political party affiliat...

Time corporate profiteers pay reparations on slave labor profits

Ladies and Gentlemen of the jury, my colleague, Ta-Nehisi Coates, has eloquently put forth the case for reparation in the June 2014 edition of The Atlantic. You can review the evidence here: http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/05/the-case-for-reparations/361631/ I come before you to deliver the closing argument for why it is time for corporate profiteers to pay reparations on the free labor profits they earned, scratch that, that they received from the forced labor of people stolen from their native land and brought to these shores to work free of wages to the enrichment of business entities. Since 2008 the term “too big to fail” has been stuck in my craw. This term came into the national lexicon during the collapse of several banks on Wall Street over the mortgage crisis, which could just as well be described as an epic scandal. Over the past six years I’ve had a hard time ...

'Turn out for what?' in midterm election

Several days ago, a social media connection sent me Rock the Vote’s video push to turn out the blue votes in this year’s midterm election. I often get information from social media connections on issues they think I might be able to influence in one of my commentaries on the social and political issues of the day. However, I'm not quite sure why this particular connection forwarded the Rock the Vote video to me because two weeks ago this person attempted to discredit my discourse as being as unreliable as Fox News. Nevertheless, this lead prompted me to question the conventional wisdom in this year’s midterm election. Let me hasten to add that I participated in early voting in my home state of Georgia over a week ago. So my vote is in the machine, just waiting to be counted on General Election Day. It is a good thing that I had already voted by the time I received the Rock the Vote video...

The Tuskegee syphilis study, Ebola and HIV: Are the chickens coming home to roost?  

Ebola has been around since the late 1970s. I’m not sure of its origins because frankly I do not trust anything my government tells me about highly contagious diseases that have the potential to wipe large segments of people off the face of the planet like syphilis, Ebola Virus Disease and Human Immunodeficiency Virus or HIV. Four years before the world was made aware of the existence of Ebola at the mouth of the Ebola River in the Congo in 1976, the American government confessed that it withheld treatment from human guinea pigs in East Alabama in the now infamous Tuskegee syphilis experiment. The experiment began in 1932 at John A. Andrews Hospital on the campus of Tuskegee Institute, now known as Tuskegee University. It would fool 600 black men into believing they were a part of a noble medical experiment that would lead to major medical breakthroughs for humankind. When the study bega...

Koch brothers’ diabolical scheme to defeat five black women candidates in Georgia

The Koch brothers got the memo several months ago that Georgia Democrats were showcasing a slate of black women candidates statewide to buttress the candidacies of Jason Carter for governor and Michelle Nunn for US Senate. The black women represent a strong team for Democrats who are trying to retake the state from Republicans. The state has been in Republican hands since the beginning of this century. On Sunday, The Washington Post ran a story on why it matters that five black women are running for statewide offices in Georgia. They can bring out the black vote in numbers large enough to propel Carter and Nunn to victory, when added to the conservative votes that Carter and Nunn can attract. According to a Republican insider who wishes to remain anonymous, the Koch brothers, multi-billionaires who support conservative causes and candidates, visited Georgia on numerous occasions this sum...

Judge Mark Fuller due back in court on wife-beating charges

Embattled Federal Court Judge Mark Fuller is due back in court on October 14 to answer charges that he beat his wife Kelli Fuller in an Atlanta hotel room back in August. Fuller will not have to admit or deny that he beat his wife at this hearing as he previously had his case diverted to a pre-trial intervention program, which required him to obtain domestic abuse counseling and to be tested for alcohol and drug abuse. The court is expected to receive evidence of Fuller’s participation in this program. If the court deems that he has successfully completed all requirements for diversion, his arrest record will be expunged and should he engage in another act of domestic violence, he will again have the benefit of the law, that he is a first time offender. Hypothetically, Fuller could abuse again and receive another slap on the wrist. Alabama lawyer Donald V. Watkins does not think justice ...